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The Battle of the Falklands

In 1927 the British Instructional Film Co. Ltd chose the Isles of Scilly as the stand-in location when making the silent film ‘The Battle of the Falklands’. Using islanders as extras, the film depicts the 1914 naval battle in which a small British fleet sank German cruisers.

Credit: Isles of Scilly Museum

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In 1927 the British Instructional Film Co. Ltd chose the Isles of Scilly as the stand-in location for the Falkland Islands when making the silent film, ‘The Battle of the Falklands’. Using islanders as extras, the film depicts the naval battle which occurred off the Falkland Islands in 1914 when a small British fleet sank German cruisers. The coastal scenery of the Isles of Scilly was said to resemble that of the Falklands.

Bringing a considerable amount of photographic equipment and a quantity of old uniforms, rifles, bayonets, and bandoliers, the film-makers recruited about 75 men and seven women and girls.

‘To obtain a goodly number of men to show up as volunteers the picture making could not begin until one o’clock on Saturday afternoon, March 12th, when most of the men had finished work for the day.  Then there was a rough assembly made in the small room at the Council buildings and the adjoining yard.  Men were rigged up in various kinds of uniform or parts of uniform, and arms of some sort served out to them, while others were engaged as carriers. 

Some of the men were rather picturesquely got up.  Mr W. Cameron and Mr W. Duncan for instance, who had huge beards fixed on their faces.  Mr Vic Trenwith got up as a Frenchman – possibly a shipwrecked sailor; while some of the boys looked really handsome with their well-groomed moustaches’. 

Source E.N.V. Moyle, Scillonian Magazine, March 1927.

Credit: Isles of Scilly Museum